Blog Archives

Beyond jobs

Does capitalism, with its accompanying technological disruptions, create more jobs than it destroys? Conventional wisdom says unequivocally “yes.” Each new wave of innovation eventually brings new jobs in number and value far greater than those it displaces. Telegraph readers become

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Posted in Economics, Uncategorized

Ending the era of the “job”

When my late grandmother was a girl in rural Arkansas, no one had a job. Everyone old enough to walk and carry a pail worked from dawn to dusk. Work was endless, cruel and utterly universal, but a “job” in

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Posted in Economics, Political Theory, Uncategorized, Welfare State

Republicans are missing our ride

Wouldn’t it be great for Republicans to line up behind a massively popular force that pits entrepreneurship and innovation against corrupt political interests? Even better, what if that same force was helping ordinary people improve their lives and opening up

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Posted in Economics, Republican Party, Technology, Uncategorized

Why I live in a white neighborhood

“Don’t take this the wrong way, but you sound like you’re a white guy.” In her clipped, Back of the Yards accent, our realtor began to communicate her concerns about our initial choice of neighborhoods. We were about to get

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Posted in Civil Rights, Economics, Uncategorized

1957

In quiet suburbs white children played on the lawn with Hula Hoops and Slinkies. Teenagers visited the soda shop for a chaste night out. Mothers had dinner on the table when dad came home from work. Elvis Presley and Marilyn

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Posted in Economics, Uncategorized

Income Inequality: Missing the Big Picture

Across a large swath of both the left and right this notion has become so accepted that it is treated as self-evident: a tiny percentage of very rich Americans are reaping all the rewards of global capitalism while the rest

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Posted in Economics, Uncategorized

A 4th Era of Capitalism

A century ago in 1916, after decades of deadly protests, union railroad workers won the right to an eight-hour a day, six-day work week. Other workers would not earn the same rights until 1933. The latest trend in corporate management

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Posted in Economics

The European Model

Life in the social democracies of Western Europe is nice…really nice. Beautifully neat, well-organized cities are connected via plentiful and inexpensive mass transit. Work-life balance is an obsessive cultural priority. European countries feature six weeks of paid vacation, maternity leave,

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Posted in Economics

Unintended consequences of the solar revolution

In 2014, for the second year in a row, solar power was the largest source of new energy in the US. Solar power delivered by utilities doubled last year and the growth is accelerating. Last week, Tesla made an announcement

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Posted in Economics, Environment, Evolution

Growth of negative-yield bonds

All over the world now you can enjoy the privilege of buying government debt that pays you a negative yield. In effect, you are paying a small premium to the issuing government for the privilege of carrying their debt. This

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Posted in Economics
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