Race and America’s Lousy Infrastructure

Good analysis from the Noahpinion blog on America’s persistent problems delivering quality public infrastructure. From roads to schools to health to communications and beyond, the world’s richest and most powerful nation looks pretty rickety to those who have spent time in Europe or East Asia. Why?:

At least since the 1970s, the Republican party has successfully raised opposition to government spending among large numbers of white people, especially in the South and in rural areas, by convincing them that government spending is mostly racial redistribution from whites to blacks. Talk to a Republican voter about government spending, and this idea will come out pretty quickly. If you don’t believe me, just do a Google search for “racial redistribution”.

It’s not really true, of course; white people receive about the same number of dollars in benefits that they pay in taxes. But the meme persists, and it looks uncomfortably like the kind of thing that Easterly and Alesina document. Interestingly, many Republicans also seem to think that government shifts money from whites to Hispanics, when actually the reverse is probably true. The negative attitude that America’s right-wing minority has toward blacks has partially spilled over into their attitude toward Hispanics. That’s bad news.

How much this effect contributes to problems delivering infrastructure is debatable, but for those old enough to remember public pools being filled with dirt to defeat desegregation it certainly rings true. Try to build a commuter rail line in a Southern city and listen carefully to the objections being raised.

This is why we can’t have nice things.

Chris Ladd is a Texan living in the Chicago area. He has been involved in grassroots Republican politics for most of his life. He was a Republican precinct committeeman in suburban Chicago until he resigned from the party and his position after the 2016 Republican Convention. He can be reached at gopliferchicago at gmail dot com.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Civil Rights
268 comments on “Race and America’s Lousy Infrastructure
  1. Please let me know if you’re looking for a article
    writer for your weblog. You have some really good articles and I think I would be a good asset.

    If you ever want to take some of the load off, I’d really
    like to write some material for your blog in exchange for a link back to mine.
    Please send me an email if interested. Thank you!

  2. Thank you for the auspicious writeup. It in
    fact was a amusement account it. Look advanced to more added agreeable from you!
    By the way, how could we communicate?

  3. goplifer says:

    Dan and Bubba, you’re taking up too much of my time. Please tone down the personal comments. Thx.

  4. rightonrush says:

    Too funny not to share. Warning: It does contain written adult language.

    “A Southerner moves up North”

    http://www.mindspring.com/~toxiccow/14_0378.html

    • desperado says:

      Yep, that would be me up in the frozen country. I’ll stay down here and deal with the summers. I don’t have to shovel heat off the driveway.

    • bubbabobcat says:

      Ironically I think North Carolina is snowed in too right now.

      • John Galt says:

        Yes, they are measuring the snow in the Raleigh-Durham area by the foot this morning. You know it is bad when they postpone the Duke-Carolina game, which was supposed to have been last night.

    • DanMan says:

      That is hilarious. When my parents moved out of the city they bought a place on the edge of the Sam Houston National Forest. It went just like this. At first they would marvel at how beautiful the deer were. We have recordings where you can hear my mom squealing with delight at how close they came at dusk.

      Within a year she was a deer hating machine that would do anything to keep the dang giant forest rats away from the house. Apparently they will eat anything pretty much like a goat.

      Back to the weather…we woke up to clear skies and bright sun finally. Anticipated high of 65, hitting 78 over the weekend. Spring is coming in. Finally.

    • Texan5142 says:

      Living in Minnesota I can attest to that.

  5. Tuttabella says:

    AS I WAS SAYING . . . back to the original blog post. From my personal experience talking to my fellow Houstonians and reading their comments on news sites, where people tend to be brutally honest, I don’t think opposition to rail service in Houston is based on racism. The objections I’ve come across are mostly about dishing out all this money for something that won’t be used. Simple as that.

    Sorry, Mr. Lifer, but not everything can be attributed to racism. Maybe we’re just practical and frugal, or perhaps overly attached to our cars, or hard-headed, refusing to see what’s “in our best interests,” and as a result maybe we will never have nice things, but ’tis not necessarily racism, at least not in Houston. I can’t speak for the entire nation.

    • kabuzz61 says:

      Houston has no zoning so the work place is scattered about. Houston should have gone with elevated rails to ease congestion and trains run faster. Street level is a hazard waiting to happen.

      • Tuttabella says:

        Kabuzz, that’s another thing we Houstonians are historically and notoriously stubborn about — ZONING.

      • DanMan says:

        I like no zoning.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Elevated rails would have been more expensive, and local conservatives belly-ached about the cost at street level anyway. I can hardly seem them suddenly becoming rail boosters for a more costly option.

      • DanMan says:

        I promoted the elevated option. DanMa’am worked at the HTC consortium that put the first light rail design out. Although it was conceptual and really only defined the initial route it was defeated by referendum.

        There were several good ideas back then. One I liked had cars that would detach and connect as the train went down the tracks. The idea was to have the passengers know when to move to the back of the train to get off and the cars that re-attached would allow passengers to walk forward to stay with the train as that car became populated with the next departures. Some preferred everything at street but most liked the idea of elevating over major streets to keep traffic in both directions working.

        Most of those engineers either went back to their original firms or joined Metro.

      • kabuzz61 says:

        Actually, Owly AGAIN doesn’t know. Danman is correct. Added to that the mayor at the time, with Dr. Wenerti Chairman of the Texas Medical Center, wanted street level. With the Mayor’s connections with Texas DOT, it was fixed from the beginning.

        Add onto that was Owly’s incorrect statement about cost. Elevated is certainly cheaper.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Kabuzz, here’s an open invitation to educate me. As you’ve seen, I’ve provided several links in this discussion and others to document my claims. Can you do the same?

    • CaptSternn says:

      Seems we can’t get to that point here, Tutt. Lifer is the only one on the left that seems to actually be making that claim. And even he isn’t doing much of anything to defend the claim that is the topic of this entry on his blog.

      • DanMan says:

        Because it is a typical democrat talking point Capt. Like Obamacare and all of its lies, they are worn out defending it.

    • lomamonster says:

      Anything we can’t smash a coin on is not worth it anyway…

    • GG says:

      I will agree Tutt. I’ve not really ever thought about racism being linked to our infrastructure but I too always attributed it to politicians sucking up to oil and just being plain cheap and resistant to change and progress.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        GG, it may not be direct or overt, but when you don’t care or refuse to implement or fund projects that primarily benefit the minority and poor “others” for the most part, then it is racist.

    • Houston-Stay-At-Homer says:

      Tutt,

      I think we could probably find instances of differences in public funding for infrastructure-related things based on the ethnic group makeup of the area, but the data will be pulled all over the place for different issues.

      Last summer and the summer before that, there was a dust-up over the closing of public swimming pools across the nation, and there seemed to be some trends that did not favor minority neighborhoods. Here in Houston, the esteemed Sheila Jackson Lee cajoled a couple of the oil companies to fund a city pool in a historically black neighborhood (then she promptly trampled six children while rushing to a TV camera to tell the world about it).

      The data will then be turned on its head when looking at public funding for housing, which will then fall disproportionately towards minority neighborhoods.

      You could look at the schools around the country (and Houston), and you would quickly see differences in infrastructure and facilities.

      I do not know if there are data suggesting there are more potholes on streets in certain neighborhoods versus others but a drive through Bellaire (technically a different “city”), you will notice immediately when you cross outside the Bellaire city limits on residential streets.

      New York City had some issues where the streets were plowed of snow (and hurricane Sandy cleanup) in well-to-do neighborhoods much quicker than they were plowed in poorer neighborhoods.

  6. rightonrush says:

    If I might be so bold. On down in the threads there was post regarding my swilling beer on my makeshift deck that’s semi-attached to my trailer by my one of my least favorite puzzies Buzz. Having stated that it was too cold to swill beer on my makeshift deck, plus waiting for a warm spell to take down my Christmas lights led to a discussion of favorite cold weather drinks. My wife “insists” that I drink one of her special concoctions to keep the chill away. This is how she makes it: 1-large frozen pineapple concentrate, 1 large frozen orange juice concentrate, 1 gallon of apple juice. Put the frozen concentrated PA & OJ. plus apple juice into large pan (she uses our seafood pot) DO NOT ADD WATER. Do add about 2-3 cups of brown sugar, cloves (to taste) and cinnamon sticks (to taste). Bring to almost a boil and let simmer for about 20 minutes. Serve hot with a shot of your fav. Bourbon. I haven’t had a cold in 30 years, all due I’m sure to this special elixir.

    • GG says:

      That sounds like what we call wassail.

    • way2gosassy says:

      I make something similar and it is wonderful!

      • rightonrush says:

        I really like it Sass. It’s sorta sweet and sour plus the bourbon smooths out the taste after about 4 of’em.

    • Texan5142 says:

      Sounds to me like a Hot Toddy, my Dad made a batch when I was living with him in New Orleans when I was getting a cold and stuffed up, works well to loosen everything up and get rid of congestion. Good times, I was only 17 or 16 can’t remember, maybe because of the Hot Toddy.

      • GG says:

        I’ll attest to the magical healing properties of hot, alcoholic beverages. One of the first things I do if I think I’m getting a cold or flu is make a hot toddy with whiskey, fresh lemon juice, honey and a cinnamon stick. A few of those, a good night’s rest (thanks to the whiskey) and all is right in the morning. There’s a reason our old grannies kept it around for “medicinal” purposes.

      • rightonrush says:

        I was raised by my grandparents (Mom & Dad killed in car wreck) when I was 2 yrs. old Granny was 1/2 Mescalero Apache and used all type of natural medicines on my sister and I. It didn’t kill us, but boy, when I look back at her solution for pin worms, coughs etc. I cringe.

      • GG says:

        I don’t know what it is but Mescalaro Apache sounds like serious stuff.

      • rightonrush says:

        Granny was tough, she had to be.

    • GG says:

      Wow, that’s pretty hateful and not at all Christ-like. What was it Ghandi said? “I like Jesus, it’s his followers I don’t like” or something like that.

    • DanMan says:

      Oh the irony is rich with that effort. It’s a hilarious response to the attacks gays are placing on people that don’t want to associate with them.

      “This is a solution searching for a problem,” said Monica Hopkins, executive director of ACLU of Idaho.

      That is exactly how I view the case in New Mexico where the lesbian perfesser showed her class how to get in people’s business by suing them for not baking her a cake. That you can’t see it is even better.

      • rightonrush says:

        Poor Dan, I bet those mean old gays attack you every time you leave your house. What’s a lesbian perfesser?

      • GG says:

        Police and doctors take an oath.

      • GG says:

        LOL Rush. I know, I just get ATTACKED, ATTACKED, I tell you, every time I leave my house by those evil gay people.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Hey Dando, let’s propose a rule refusing medical, police, or fire service to you because you are a real Richard. On moral and decency grounds.

        “That you can’t see it is even better.”

      • GG says:

        The real idiocy is that they think a cop or doctor is going to know if a person is gay when they call 9/11 or show up in an ER. As if someone is going to call 9/11 and say “please come to 123 Maple, oh, and by the way I’m gay”.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Police have no duty to protect people to begin with. Doctors also have no duty to treat people.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Yes cappy we know. And you have no duty to be rational or make sense. Carry on.

        Did somebody seed the troll farm today or something?

      • texan5142 says:

        “Police have no duty to protect people to begin with. Doctors also have no duty to treat people.”

        I do not want to live in your version of the world.

      • desperado says:

        Doctors are unconstitutional.

      • DanMan says:

        perfect!! I knew I could bring out the best of this bunch of erudite thinkers, I really thought the comment about the handicapped at the bar in Oklahoma would do it but I guess it was too nuanced

        Here’s the actual parallel. None of you would want to hang out with me and I don’t care. I’m not going to go to any trouble to associate with any of you and you can appreciate that. So why do people that don’t want to associate with gays have to acquiesce? Because they are a set of the special snow flakes that need special rules.

        I associate with gays every day and I have no problem with it. I have no real animosity towards gays and if there is a gay that is offended by me I’ve never heard of it, except anonymously on blogs such as this where assumptions are rampant and accusations are endless.

        As a handicapped gay Hispanic female with an Asian surname I enjoy pushing y’alls buttons. It is so easy and yields great results.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Justices Rule Police Do Not Have a Constitutional Duty to Protect Someone

        http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/28/politics/28scotus.html

      • DanMan says:

        “The real idiocy is that they think a cop or doctor is going to know if a person is gay when they call 9/11 or show up in an ER.”

        It is about about the surgeon that is told he has to perform a sex change at Medicaid rates to keep his license and you’d be closer to what they are addressing.

      • desperado says:

        Nah, you’re here because Old McSparkle shut down the Obama Haters farm.

      • GG says:

        I would say that by taking a job “vowing to protect and serve” means doing so regardless of race, color, creed or sexual orientation. A cop could be in the KKK but will still have to call in a neighborhood he might not like the “color” of.

      • GG says:

        “Doctors are unconstitutional”. That made me chuckle.

      • rightonrush says:

        DanMan wrote “As a handicapped gay Hispanic female with an Asian surname I enjoy pushing y’alls buttons. It is so easy and yields great results”.

        Michelle Malkin is that you?

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Cappy there you go again lacking nuance. The SCOTUS ruling was a narrow vote based on a legalese interpretation that the mother did not have “property rights” in requesting enforcement of a restraining order. A horrible ruling nonetheless but not at all encompassing as cappy would like to broadly apply to his ridiculous proclamations.

      • CaptSternn says:

        GG, police only have a duty tom protect the general police. Yes, they will come running when called and will do their best, but maybe they are all out on other calls, or they don’t know the situation, like with a school shooting. They have no duty to put themselves in harm’s way.

        It is also impossible to protect every person, every minute of every day. Your protection, that of your family and your property is your personal responsibility. When seconds count, police are minutes away.

        You can also Google “ambulance bews refuse to help” and find many stories of people dying as a result. They can’t be sued because they don’t have the duty to help. And again, even if they wanted to, sometimes all are out on other calls. Nor are doctors slaves, they can refuse to treat a person. Only the ER is required to see people, and they might be swamped, leaving people sitting for hours. There are cases of people dying while waiting, still can’t be sued.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        GG don’t burst cappy’s bubble that he is a Superman unto himself and not obligated to anyone and not reliant on anyone in his lonely little mental and physical bunker.

        Didn’t you see Jimmy Kimmel last night? Superman refused to stop a thief from breaking into a patrol car and stealing a laptop in LA.

      • GG says:

        Well, cappy, that’s not exactly what I meant but whatever. Of course they may be busy and of course they can’t be everywhere at once but if they are not busy and they are sitting and drinking coffee and get a call they are not fulfilling their job description and perhaps in the wrong line of work. Do you deliberately misconstrue people’s meanings?

      • texan5142 says:

        That is where you are wrong Dan, I might not agree with you, but that does not mean I would not ” Hang out with you” . Next time I am in Texas I will buy you dinner if you like and we can have a conversation .

      • DanMan says:

        That would be cool with me Texan. Friday night is steak night at my place.

      • Tuttabella says:

        I’d have to read the Supreme Court ruling, but off the top of my head I would think that in the case of a dire emergency, emergency personnel such as police, paramedics, and E/R doctors and nurses SHOULD NOT discriminate against a victim or patient and not help or treat him, simply because the victim or patient would have no other recourse at that given moment, and it could mean life or death, similar to the law that says that the E/R must accept anyone who shows up at their facility, regardless of ability to pay.

        This would not apply to a routine call or visit to the police station or doctor’s office, in which case the victim or patient would have the time and the opportunity to go elsewhere for assistance.

      • kabuzz61 says:

        Danman, do you wonder why I call this bunch the echo chamber. Not an original thought between them. Just butt kissing each other continuously. They are like the very needy high school clique where they worry all the time that they might not be liked. Sad, sad. Especially GG, she can’t suck up fast enough.

      • DanMan says:

        yep kabuzz, in my highschool we had kickers, jets and freaks. I was a kicker freak that ran in all crowds because I always had wheels and was in several clubs. It’s where I learned to get along with people and sort out the ones that got in my way. Public school in the big city was fun in my experience.

        But I pretty much agree its an echo chamber in this place. Glad to see you again.

      • CaptSternn says:

        I posted a link to one cae. There are several rulings on the subject. That is just the way it is. The police have no more duty to protect you than I do. Cry about it all you want, but there is the reality.

        http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1976377/posts

        By the way, I mean to say “protect the general peace”, not the general police.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Well I will make one minor correction, police do have the duty to protect a person in their custody. People they have detained, arrested, jailed or imprisoned.

      • Tuttabella says:

        Cry about it all I want ??? 😦

      • Tuttabella says:

        No wonder the prisons are filled to capacity, with all those people seeking protection.

      • DanMan says:

        to the echo chamber point – featured in the link that the rucas posse blew up over:

        “However, Luker noted, emergency personnel couldn’t refuse to treat someone and does not authorize the “the intentional infliction of emotional or physical injury.”

        Look at their comments.

        Not a one of them saw it apparently but they all jumped on the same sled to denounce the concept. It really is the 180 degree yet exact same thing of the wedding cake story and not a one of them saw it. They can’t see it. They don’t want to see it. And they embarrass themselves arguing about something that wasn’t even relevant to the story.

        And once again, they ride off into the sunset thinking they are the ones who care. Watching liberals express themselves is good entertainment isn’t it?

      • CaptSternn says:

        Um, Tutt, that was a reply to GG and her comment that it was only one case and a very narrow ruling.

        Our prisons are overflowing due to prohibition. Lots of non-violent criminals that should be there in the first place. But there are some cases of people intentionally being sent to prison for health care. I once met a guy that wanted to be in jail or prison rather than free. He said he was taken care of in prison and he knew the system. He was not comfortable being free, he didn’t know what to do or how to support himself.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Well whaddayaknow, Dan the richard now claims he wasn’t such a richard as a teenage turdling and was “beloved” by eeeeeeeveryone in high school. Because he had a mechanic phallic pacifier to puff himself up with his adoring peers. Dan is “king” yet again in his self described life. I am absolutely stunned by this latest “revelation”.

        Coming up: Dan was adored and hand fed grapes and macaroons by his parents, siblings, neighbors, classmates, the football team, cheerleaders, the Crips AND the Bloods, ….

        We should start charging you by the post for therapy. Not that any of it helps you.

      • Tuttabella says:

        Cap wrote: The police have no more duty to protect you than I do.
        ************************************
        I know you were addressing someone else, but still, I’m glad you said this, because you are correct. The realization has sunk in that the only person who can truly protect me is me, and I find the realization liberating and empowering. You and I both know what measures I need to take, the ones we’ve been discussing lately. Thanks for the jolt.

      • rucasdad says:

        “Police have no duty to protect people to begin with. Doctors also have no duty to treat people.”

        Go say that in the face of a cop who puts his life on the line every day to protect and to serve and watch them slap the stupid out of you. Jesus Christ, you guys aren’t even good trolls….

      • GG says:

        I will also add that I have “pals” here and, yes, we cut up and aren’t serious all the time but that’s what pals do and like minds do tend to think alike just as you teabaggers think alike and back each other up. If you don’t see the hypocrisy of you calling others “suck ups” and such you are truly and pathetically blind.

        Now, as Chris suggested perhaps we can all try to keep from personal attacks which Buzz and Dan thrive on because they have nothing else to say.

      • rucasdad says:

        “No wonder the prisons are filled to capacity, with all those people seeking protection.”

        Right, because overcrowding in prisons have nothing to do with the idiotic war on drugs…

        Where do these people come from and how are they not an a immediate danger to themselves or those around them?

      • rucasdad says:

        I literally just got off the phone with a buddy of mine who has been with HPD for the past 7 years and I asked him….”How many times do you consider the constitutional rights of your job when you’re on duty?”.

        His literal reply…”What fucktard has the time to think about that when someone’s life is in danger?”

        You guys can attempt to tarnish the reputation of others on here but please, PLEASE, refrain from doing it to people with families who are paid to put their life on the line everyday for strangers. I’d like to hope that you guys are at least better than that…

      • GG says:

        Cappy, try and refrain from linking to FR if you to be taken seriously.

      • rucasdad says:

        You know, it’s one thing to be an advocate for the 2nd amendment (surprise, surprise! I am one too). However, when you intentionally and facetiously attempt to undermine the jobs of those who’ve sworn to put their life on the line for strangers, renders you nothing but a piece of rubbish.

        Anyone who has EVER taken a CHL class or a self defense course, knows, that to stop a threat to yourself or loved ones with deadly force is the absolute last line of defense. Yet, whenever you read people like Capt (couch warrior), who give the old cliche, “when seconds count, police are minutes away.”, only enables innocent people to be killed like what happened to Renesha McBride, Jordan Davis and Trayvon Martin. It does nothing to help and only makes people more paranoid than what’s needed. When given the option of police assistance or to stop someone with deadly force, one should always use the former if possible.

        Tut, Capt, you guys should take a brief moment out of your day and take a look at those who didn’t have time to consider whether it was their “constitutional duty” to help serve and protect. Quite sobering if you ask me.

        http://www.odmp.org/

    • way2gosassy says:

      May the fleas of a thousand camels infest his armpits!

    • GG says:

      So says the ass-kisser Buzzy. You don’t have anything to say except to scream “leftist” you sad, sad old man. You merely yap at Dan’s and Cap’s comments. At least I give MY opinion.

  7. Tuttabella says:

    Mr. Lifer wrote: “How much this effect (racism) contributes to problems delivering infrastructure is debatable.”
    *********************************************
    Okay, back to the original blog post. From my personal experience talking to my fellow Houstonians and reading their comments on news sites, where people tend to be brutally honest, I don’t think opposition to rail service in Houston is based on racism. The objections I’ve come across are mostly about dishing out all this money for something that won’t be used. Simple as that.

    • DanMan says:

      We used to have street cars here too, there is a Ken Burns documentary that forwards the premise they were removed from many cities by interests from the automobile industry in order to sell more cars, tires, batteries, fuel, etc. I believe he calls out GM specifically in this endeavor.

      The old train to Galveston was called the Interurban and ran north south between I-45 and Hwy 3. One of its stations is still standing on College Avenue and was used by Adam’s Aerial Photography for many years. If you look on GoogleEarth you can still make out the alignment in several places. From what I understand, once cars became so prevalent its ridership fell. There has been recent talk to revive it and have it terminal at the railroad museum in Galveston.

      • texan5142 says:

        Nice history Dan, it would be nice to revive it, would be nice to take light rail from Houston to the strand. Minnesota has been installing light rail and the ridership has responded. How is the ridership on Houston’s light rail?

  8. texan5142 says:

    GG says:
    February 12, 2014 at 1:32 pm
    Please explain why you call him Dan the Richard.

    Because sometimes he/she is a Dick.

  9. rightonrush says:

    Paging Nurse Ratched

    “Someone’s Been Sending GOP Lawmakers A Bizarre Threat Over The Debt Ceiling

    House Republicans have been getting a weird email in recent weeks: a threat over the debt ceiling vote that’s been sent to the lawmakers’ closely guarded personal email addresses. “It’s got to be another member. Probably one of the crazy ones,” one GOP lawmaker said”.

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/johnstanton/someones-been-sending-gop-lawmakers-a-bizarre-threat-over-th

  10. bubbabobcat says:

    Off topic side note:

    The party of fearmongering and hypocrisy is strongarming/blackmailing a VW plant in Tennessee to not vote to unionize.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/business/automaker-gives-its-blessings-and-gop-its-warnings.html?hp

    So much for the “party of small government”, “big business” and “freedom of choice” huh?

    Never mind even the German owners of the VW plant approve of unionizing because that is what works in Germany and what contributed to their innovations and success.

    Cue the requisite illogically delusional and fact challenged alternate reality hysterical bleating from the usual wingnut gallery suspects…

    • DanMan says:

      Meanwhile Obama made his 28th change to Obamacare yesterday but still keeps the individual mandate in place. I wonder why he’s keeping individuals from making choices but allows corporations to?

      Oh, and did you hear that small businesses have to certify to the IRS they are not making staffing decisions based on the costs of Obamacare? So every business that makes a decision based on every other tax consequence can’t do so when it comes to the Obamacare tax.

      Cue the requisite illogically delusional and fact challenged alternate reality hysterical bleating from the usual democrat gallery suspects…

      • desperado says:

        Benghazi!!!!!!!!!

      • DanMan says:

        right on que, Craig crushes the facts with his burnished logic

      • GG says:

        Wasn’t there a drinking game for that Des? Every time a freeper yelled Benghazi everyone took a swig?

      • DanMan says:

        you must have started already gg since Craig said it

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Thank you Old Faithful. Spewing hot air on cue without fail.

        This is so tiresome I will just repost my previous response to your irrational wingnut clone buzzy:

        No matter how much you delusionally troll rant Dandelion, it will never make sense or be factually accurate. The ACA is the law and here to stay. The Supreme Court has validated it. The country and voting public have accepted it. And Congress has accepted it despite the wingnut minority in the House delusionally tilting at windmills and failing 46 times to repeal it.

        Deal with it.

        Not even going to attempt to refute the wingnut Tennessee Repub mob boss tactics Dano?

        “BENGAZI!!!!!!!!!!!!! [sic]”

        (and a tip of the hat to Wet/Dry Noodles for his nuance in noting the all caps and misspelling for a more accurate portrayal.)

        Now let’s hear a story about how soooo much smarter you are than your entire inbred clan going back six generations Danny. Don’t tear a rotator cuff twisting your arm to pat yourself on the back more thoroughly.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        And Daring Danny, notice the proper grammatical usage of “cue” vs “que”. But it’s ok you’re still sooooo smart. In your own fake world. When you compare yourself to your own family when they can’t rebut your self aggrandizing lies or defend themselves. You will throw anyone under the bus to assuage your own longstanding insecurities won’t you Dashing Danny?

      • GG says:

        Please explain why you call him Dan the Richard.

      • DanMan says:

        gg, several of the rucas posse have an anatomy fixation when it comes to discussing their passion, which I take is the religion of liberalism. In their passion they exude their true character, which embodies the maturity of a pre-pubescent child.

        Our humble host censored my comment this morning when I pointed this out. They are amusing themselves in this instance by referring to me as the favorite object of their attention, which is their…ahem, anatomy.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        GG, in the same vein Richard Nixon’s nickname was “Tricky Dicky”.

        Brevity was never your strong point was it Dan/Richard? Especially when talking about yourself or your favorite male anatomy part. We on the other hand were merely referring to your character, or lack thereof.

      • DanMan says:

        my, my how the rucas posse is stirred up today! cabin fever getting to you guys?

      • kabuzz61 says:

        Danman called you out. Predictable as ever.

        Also, que is acceptable in this example.

        The echo chamber is having a real love fest today.

        And yes Danman, I noticed the men focusing on male genitalia.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Awwww, buzzy attempts to chime in his two cents and shortchanges everyone. So French or Spanish is grammatically appropriate for “right on que [sic]” as you and DanDunce ignorantly insist?

        Or perhaps you were doubly wrong and referring to a misspelled usage of “queue” which is still incorrect.

        Wingnut “intelligence” and pathetically insecure attempt at oneupmanship fail yet again.

        Thanks for playing and continuing to demonstrate your compounded ignorance upon Dan’s ignorance buzzy.

    • Texan5142 says:

      “So much for the “party of small government”, “big business” and “freedom of choice” huh?”

      Yep!

      http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2014/02/auto_dealers_push_legislation.html

    • texan5142 says:

      “So much for the “party of small government”, “big business” and “freedom of choice” huh?”

      Yep!

      http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2014/02/auto_dealers_push_legislation.html

    • texan5142 says:

      Please show me how Ray Nagin and Obama are buddies? I can’t find it, also, a little racist to assume that because Nagin is black that Obama would pardon him. This is why you are called Dan the Richard.

    • bubbabobcat says:

      Sucks to get what you give eh Danny Dogdoo? You’re welcome.

      And stop being so cheap. Buy yourself a mirror already. And spring 50 bucks for an hour with a professional rather than free therapy on the internets.

    • rightonrush says:

      Speaking of prissy little tarts, did you hear about David Vitter and his full diaper?

    • DanMan says:

      Let’s see, you guys have links that you want to tar your opposition with as evidenced above yet you take any umbrage at any similar pushback. Hypocrisy, you has it!

      Keep ’em coming lightweights

    • DanMan says:

      racist? that card was maxed out long ago, I win again when that’s all you have. Thanks for playing though.

    • bubbabobcat says:

      Rush, I’m glad you didn’t provide a link. I typed “David Vitter” into Google and it automatically finished it with “diaper” as first choice. That was classic.

      Unfortunately, Louisiana being what it is, that won’t stop them from voting him in as Governor in 2015. Edwin Edwards was convicted of bribery and was voted in overwhelmingly as Governor. And believe it or not, he was the lesser of the two evils in that race.

    • rightonrush says:

      Bubba, Vitter will be the next governor of La. They go from an exorcist that cast demons outta college co-eds to a guy who likes to wears $hitty diapers. Par for the course for our neighbors to the East.

  11. flypusher says:

    I’ve ridden the Metro in DC, SEPTA in the Philly area, and the L in Chicago. I have no doubts that mass transit is needed and could work in Houston, but only if people stop clinging to every old excuse not to, and get something built. I’ve seen constant freeway expansion in the decades I’ve lived here, but the traffic always expands to fill up the additional lanes. Let’s take the first step; get rail lines to the airports!!

    SanFran has good transit too, of course, but when I’m there I’m walking as much as possible. It’s the best walking city I’ve ever visited.

  12. Tuttabella says:

    One thing that stands out in my mind from when my mom and I used to ride the city bus in Houston when I was little, in the early ’70s, pre-Metro, was how my mom was always dressed to the nines, in matching coat and skirt, hose and high heels, fresh as a daisy, cool as a cucumber, whether it was the heat of summer or the cold of winter, and when it rained she would simply wear galoshes over her heels. Society has become so much more casual about dress over the years, which I think is great, but I’m still impressed by the formality of days past.

    • Tuttabella says:

      My apologies for the cliche-ridden comment. Dressed to the nines. Fresh as a daisy. Cool as a cucumber. It sounded good while I was typing.

    • GG says:

      I agree to a certain extent. I’m not saying we should wear hats and gloves but go to a store now and you will see women schlepping around in their p.j.s and house slippers. If you want to see just how bad it’s gotten visit peopleofwalmart.com.

  13. John Galt says:

    Surely we are in need of serious infrastructure investment, roads, airports, regular ports, urban transit, and rail. But this notion of widespread high-speed rail is a bit nutty. It’s a cool idea, but it makes no sense – the distances are just too vast. O/D traffic from Dallas to Houston just can’t fill up the many trains per day that would be required to even pay the maintenance on the track, much less build the damn thing in the first place.

    Rail makes sense in the NE, where the density of population is much higher, but the “high speed” rail there is a joke, because the track is not adequate. I think I read that the Acela can reach top speed for only about 20 miles of the Boston-NY run.

    Spend money on urban mass transit to give cities real subway networks (such as only a few American cities have today), on real high speed rail in the NE, on upgraded road capacity in many places, and on making sure bridges don’t collapse underneath me.

  14. Tuttabella says:

    We continue to honor Black History Month, and in keeping with the subject of today’s blog entry . . .

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cb2w2m1JmCY&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dcb2w2m1JmCY

  15. Owl of Bellaire says:

    Chris, what’s the source for your extended quotation? I don’t see it in the referenced blog post, nor in the comments there.

    • CaptSternn says:

      Yes, there is no proof that racism exists by denying Sanderson, TX, an underground subway is based on racism. Imagine that. Or denying an underground or high speed rail between Sanderson, Odessa, San Angelo, Kerrville and Uvalde is based on racism. Lifer usually participates on his blog comments. Maybe this is one that he wishes he had not made?

      If you’ve decided to remain defiantly and dubiously confused, Owl, I’m not going to bother to try to fix it.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Sternn, how can you be so obstinately obdurate? No-one is proposing high-speed rail between the hamlets of West Texas. That you have to reach for such straw men is stunning proof of your own inadequacy.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Yes, Owl, I think you might be getting close to getting the point. It is absurd to suggest that being against rail in Houston or between Texas cities is racist. But I wasn’t the one that made such a claim in the first place.

  16. CaptSternn says:

    All of this talk about people wanting to take a train to Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, etc., got me curious. I have learned from Tutt that there is an Amtrak station here in Houston, so I checked for schedules from Houston to those other cities. They exist. We already have rail to those places. So now I wonder, these folks that say they want it and would use it if it existed, do y’all use it since it does exist? Did any of you even know that we already have rail to those places?

    • Tuttabella says:

      I looked at Amtrak’s schedule from Houston to San Antonio, and it seems there’s only one trip there per day, and it leaves about 4 in the morning, so I don’t recommend it. I DO recommend Greyhound, which has frequent service, day and night, and it’s low cost. But I think many people are rather snobbish about going Greyhound.

    • Owl of Bellaire says:

      I’ve used Amtrak. I once rode between here and Washington, D.C.

      It was miserable.

      From what I understand, passenger trains must yield to freight, and our railways have become more and more congested with commercial freight traffic without accompanying increases in capacity. So we arrived more than 24 hours late at our destination.

      A dedicated, high-speed passenger line would be a marvel.

      • Bobo Amerigo says:

        From Logan in Boston, I take trains to the neighborhoods of my friends.

        And once, when planes out of Newark got snowed in, I took a train from Newark to DC. Made my meeting just fine.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        The Northeast has more ridership, more sympathetic governments, and thus better service, from what I understand.

      • Bobo Amerigo says:

        Exactly.

      • kabuzz61 says:

        I believe that miserable is your persistent state.

      • flypusher says:

        “The Northeast has more ridership, more sympathetic governments, and thus better service, from what I understand.”

        The DC-Philly route I rode was convenient, on time, with zero problems.

      • GG says:

        “I believe that miserable is your persistent state.”

        Oh, brother, this from the old sour “puss” who never has one pleasant thing to say to anyone. Pot, kettle, black.

    • Tuttabella says:

      I wouldn’t mind taking Amtrak on a short trip within Texas, just to see what it’s like.

      I remember there was a train (don’t think it was Amtrak) between Houston and Galveston, but it is now defunct, from underuse.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Underuse would be the biggest problem. As some have said here, they would like it for the occasional visit for a concert or event, but not often, much less daily. The only way a high speed, dedicated rail would work is if people lived in Houston and worked in Dallas or San Antonio. Then how many stations would we need? People would be stuck in rush hour traffic just trying to get to a station, then what would they do on the other end? Park and Ride work well just for those reasons, and use existing infrastructure like the HOV lanes.

        To bring it back to Lifer’s latest entry, how is any of this racist?

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        “To bring it back to Lifer’s latest entry, how is any of this racist?”

        Mass transit tends to mean transit for the masses: you know, *those* people.

        And, as is the nature with a properly progressive tax system (not that Texas actually has one), the bulk of the costs will be supported by those with the most capacity to pay: the set that have chauffeurs or private jets, and little need for mass transit.

        Add in our nation’s ongoing legacy of correlated ethnicity and poverty, and you have the recipe for the ugly stew that Chris describes.

      • CaptSternn says:

        “Those people” that live in big cities, Owl? That is supposed to be racist? Makes no sense to me. Why don’t you try to explain yourself there?

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        If you’ve decided to remain defiantly and dubiously confused, I’m not going to bother to try to fix it.

      • kabuzz61 says:

        Captain, it is clear that Owly views people who take public transportation as ‘them people’. Owly got called out but can’t call it back in.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Obstinately obdurate. You nailed it Owl. Openly obtuse. Lacking nuance. Willfully ignorant. Add buzzy to the pile Owl.

    • CaptSternn says:

      Tutt, I agree that a bus would be a better choice. Much like we discussed buses vs rail here in Houston, buses seem to do a better job in large, spread out states and cities. I used rail while in Germany, trains and street cars. We would use cabs when we could afford it. The mass transit system in Europe is much overrated by some here. Sometimes walking was a better method. But again, European nations, Europe in general, are compact and dense. There is really no way to compare that to the states outside the Northe East states where subways and mass transit, even walking, work well.

      Owl, it would be a marvel. A very lightly used marvel. People just don’t commute between the big cities that much. It would have to be subsidized even more than Amtrak. Several years ago I was sent to a conference in Dallas by my employer, flight approved. I chose to drive it instead. It would take about the same amount of time dealing with security, luggage and trasportation on either end. Then I would be stuck at the hotel and could not change my schedule as I saw fit. Trains in Germany are a bit more flexible, unless you miss the last run and get stranded overnight at the station. No, buses and POVs are better in this part of the nation and state.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Buses get stuck in (and add to) traffic just like everything else.

        Apparently, Texas is actually considered quite a viable prospect.

        Or perhaps not.

        http://transportationblog.dallasnews.com/2012/05/texas-is-tops-in-nation-for-super-commuters-with-dallas-to-houston-leading-the-way.html/

      • CaptSternn says:

        That’s interesting, Owl. A private venture would be the way to go, with no public funds. But as your link pointed out, that would not be possible and people would still have to deal with rush hour traffic to get to the stations. Hey, how about including it in the Trans-Texas Corridor. No doubt you would support that, right?

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        In Washington, DC, you can take the Metro to Union Station to get onto an Amtrak train. There’s much less need to wade through auto traffic than you’re suggesting.

        Houston’s light rail should, eventually, not only run to both airports, but also to a high-speed rail hub located not too far from the center of the area’s population (perhaps northwest of downtown, and even outside the Loop).

        Might some land have to be seized by eminent domain to accomplish that? Sure. We did it in the 1950s for the highway system, and I’m pretty sure most folks consider it worth the unpleasantness.

        (As a history buff, I love looking at old maps of downtown, with streets that no longer exist “under” 59, 45, etc.)

      • CaptSternn says:

        Seriously Owl? D.C. has a square miliage of ten miles. Houston area is over 10,000 miles. Notice any difference there?

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Seriously, Sternn? D.C.’s Metro runs out from that naked urban core into the suburbs in Virginia and Maryland. Perhaps you didn’t bother to read my reference to a multi-regional transit system.

        There IS a world beyond your trailer. Perhaps you should learn more about it.

      • kabuzz61 says:

        Since D.C. transit handles the biggest movers and shakers in our country, no wonder it has what it wants. Owly is having a hard time connecting the dots.

      • Tuttabella says:

        Owl, you scare me with your mention of eminent domain. I live just northwest of downtown.

        I also love looking at old Houston maps and phone books. I have Houston phone books from 1942 and 1956, plus a Houston Street Directory from 1956. I especially like to see what used to be located at certain addresses. I believe there was a pet cemetery on the northeast corner of downtown. I also like to piece information together to figure out the old names of some streets. For example, I think Jensen Drive used to be Humble Road, and Kirby Drive was definitely Buffalo Drive. You can still see the name Buffalo on the curb at Kirby and Shepherd.

    • Tuttabella says:

      Cap, please explain to the class the gun laws on buses and trains.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Wow. I don;t know. I do know that a person with a CHL can carry on Houston Metro, though it was originally not allowed and Metro doesn’t like that to be known or advertised.

        Hmm, Amtrak is pretty vague after doing some quick searches. Nobody seems to know. I thought it might be a federal issue with the subsidies, but it is still a private company. It does allow unloaded weapons to be in checked-in luggage, but that doesn’t cover CHL holders exactly. Being a private company and private property, best guess is that Amtrak would need the 30.06 sign placed either at the station or on the entrances of the trains. That is how I would approach it.

    • GG says:

      My brother used to visit my mother on weekends, while still at UT, by Greyhound. The real adventure was picking him up at the station which is in a not so great part of Houston.

  17. rucasdad says:

    We need to declare war on ourselves. Therefore, we’d have better infrastructure.

  18. kabuzz61 says:

    Chris, are you calling yourself a racist since you claim to be a moderate old school republican? Interesting.

  19. texan5142 says:

    How I wish that I could board a high speed train in Minnesota to travel to Texas.

    • way2gosassy says:

      I’ve thought about you a lot in that frozen tundra!

    • texan5142 says:

      They could put right down the I-35 corridor with stops in major cities along the route. It is a shame we do not have a system like that. Europe is way ahead in that respect.

      http://www.eurail.com/trains-europe/high-speed-trains

      • CaptSternn says:

        Europe is very compact, small countries. Doesn’t compare to wide open, large states like Texas. More like our small group of North East states.

      • Bobo Amerigo says:

        I fondly recall taking a rapid train from Dijon to Paris, after a couple of weeks of riding bikes in France with my sister.

        If Texas had rapid trains to/from Dallas, San Antonio, Austin and Houston, I’m sure tourism in all cities would increase. Right now, if there’s an interesting art exhibit in Dallas and I want to see it, I pretty much have to plan on a trip of at least two days — unless I have a deep, inner need to punish myself with a long, sleepy drive home.

        With a rapid train, I could go up in the morning, go to the museum, eat a good dinner, and then sleep all the way to Houston, all 2-3 hours. 🙂

      • GG says:

        Yeah, but some bullet trains could cut through those wide open spaces fairly quickly.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Rather than viewing passenger rail and roads as *competitors*, we should view them as *complementary*.

        D.C. has Metro lines running down the center of several freeways. How I wish they’d added rail here during the massive I-10 expansion. But forward thinking, and the willingness to consider alternatives to entrenched interests, are hardly Texas’ style.

      • Bobo Amerigo says:

        When they tore out the double tracks to Katy for the I-10 expansion, there was a lot of slapped foreheads followed by stunned silence in my Spring Branch neighborhood. Oh, the idiocy of it.

      • flypusher says:

        “When they tore out the double tracks to Katy for the I-10 expansion, ….”

        And ripped out the tracks on the Westpark corridor…..

      • DanMan says:

        Not only did Metro rip out the tracks on Westpark, they sold 80% of that right of way to the Harris County Toll Road Authority. They still own a strip that goes almost to Fulshear.

        The timing of selling that ROW and having it get redeveloped as a toll road during the expansion of I-10 along with the rebuild of Longpoint made me think we have the most incompetent planning coordination of our local agencies ever to occur.

    • GG says:

      I had a blast riding the trains in Spain. We took the Ave from Madrid to Cordoba. Then some smaller, slower ones from there to Seville and Alicante. Not as fast but still fun. The bar cars were always packed.

      I really wish we had a good, efficient train system for travel. Flying is becoming unbearable.

      • texan5142 says:

        ” Flying is becoming unbearable.”

        You got that right, I am 6’4″ not very comfortable on a plane, especially if the person in front leans the seat back.

      • GG says:

        Being 5′ doesn’t make me any more comfortable on a plane either. I spent one flight squished between two big guys with shoulders so broad they were encroaching into my space making my shoulders hunch over. At least it was only a few hours. The worst fear I ever had was on a flight from Minneapolis to Tokyo (on my way to Indonesia) and this extremely tall, obese woman came down the aisle and sat down in the aisle seat. I was in the middle, my, at the time, 13 year old son had the window. Both of us were literally leaning sideways crushed against the bulkhead. Thankfully, the flight wasn’t full and the steward reseated her in her very own aisle. There was no way anyone could fly that long in that position.

    • rightonrush says:

      Wouldn’t that be nice!

      • rightonrush says:

        This was a reply to Tex regarding trains to Houston. I get really bumfuzzeled replying on word express.

    • DanMan says:

      take Southwest…$69 each way

  20. Tuttabella says:

    “This is why we can’t have nice things.”
    *****************************
    I keep seeing this remark. What do you mean by this?

    • Houston-Stay-At-Homer says:

      Tutt…moderately hard to explain, and I don’t know the for-sure actual origin.

      I think it started with a TV show where the kids would do something stupid and break things, and the mother would yell, “This is why we can’t have nice things!”.

      It has been re-purposed as a saying you will hear about someone or some group doing stupid things, and that stupidity is what is keeping them from having nice things.

      For instance, when Louie Gohmert says,

      And I know the president made the mistake one day of saying he had visited all 57 states, and I’m well aware that there are not 57 states in this country, although there are 57 members of OIC, the Islamic states in the world. Perhaps there was some confusion whether he’d been to all 57 Islamic states as opposed to all 50 U.S. states. But nonetheless, we have an obligation to the 50 American states, not the 57 Muslim, Islamic states. Our oath we took is in this body, in this House. And it’s to the people of America. And it’s not to the Muslim Brotherhood, who may very well take over Egypt and once they do, they are bent upon setting up a caliphate around the world, including the United States. And this administration will been [sic] complicit in helping people who wants [sic] to destroy our country.

      The proper response from a Republican should be, “This is why we can’t have nice things”…and in this case, “nice things” would be an open and welcoming GOP.

    • GG says:

      The last time I heard this was from a gay friend who used it in reference to some pics of a Pride Parade.

    • way2gosassy says:

      We went from a two vehicle family to one when I quit working. Just that alone has saved us a bundle!

      • texan5142 says:

        I would like to move closer to work so I can either bike or walk. Right now I am about fifteen miles from work and that is just to far to walk, would have two leave an hour and a half early to bike not counting mornings like today when it was -17 when I left this morning.

      • GG says:

        Biking is so dangerous in Houston. Seems like every day there’s a story about a cyclist getting hit.

      • texan5142 says:

        Minnesota has excellent bike trail system.
        http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_trails/index.html

      • DanMan says:

        Had a buddy that wrecked his brand new car and the insurance disputed the fault for months. His only option was to ride 17 miles from Lamar Terrace to the Shell Research Center on Hwy 6. Each way. He became as fit as fiddle after just a couple of months. Then they fixed his car.

        He ballooned like a tick on a dog with no legs. Apparently the carb load he has acquired during the pedaling months didn’t subside with the new found luxury of driving.

  21. Tuttabella says:

    And yes, I’m a minority — Mexican-American — my mom was born in Mexico, my dad in the Rio Grande Valley — but I’ve always considered it an advantage to know how to get around the city and the state via bus and on foot.

    • Tuttabella says:

      Darn it. I replied in the wrong place again. I meant to reply to GG.

    • GG says:

      When I was a teen living in Fairfax, VA we would hop on the train and roam DC and spend hours at the Smithsonian and just wandering around monuments, eating hot dogs by the WA monument reflecting pond, trying to sneak into bars in Georgetown. Good times…..

      Yes, it’s always good to have some working knowledge city transportation.

  22. desperado says:

    Not surprising. That timeline also coincides with the regionalization and redneckization of the Republican Party. As Republican members of Congress have become whiter, more Southern and more rural, the attitudes held by those voters are by necessity adopted by the people they send to Congress. Once upon a time when the GOP didn’t so closely resemble the cast of Dukes of Hazard, the more moderate members recognized the importance of public spending on things like infrastructure and public education. Now it’s all about ‘keep my taxes low’ and ‘keep them lazy welfare bums from takin’ my stuff.’

  23. CaptSternn says:

    Important to note the difference between republicans and conservatives. Some republicans are conservatives, some are not. We witness that from the tantrums the GOP establishment and its supporters throw in regards to actual conservatives, the tea party movement. So, I am guessing this is aimed more at the GOP establishment and its supporters, because I don’t see a lot of that from actual conservatives.

    As for infrastructure, maybe people in Houston think all roads are like Houston roads, but they aren’t. Most roads in the state are in good shape and well maintained. There are a lot of unpaved county roads in the state, but that would be a county issue. The interstates are also in pretty good shape. Most cities we have visited also have well maintained roads.

    As for a commuter rail line in a Southern city like Houston, it doesn’t make any sense. Houston is spread out, not confined like New York City. Buses work much better here, and they can change their routes easily, and they don’t disrupt the flow of traffic the way light rail does. But, um, what does any of that have to do with race or even wealth redistribution? Maybe I don’t make the connection because I am conservative?

    • GG says:

      Not sure I agree about rail. DC is very spread out and they have a great commuter rail. You can go to the city from way out in the burbs of VA and Maryland. It’s extremely spread out. It started building back when I lived there in the 70’s and just keeps expanding. My brother lives in BFE, VA and both he and his wife take the train to work and when they want a jaunt into the city. Much less stress on them and their cars plus it saves on fuel. I think rail would be great for Houston. Many is the time I’d like to go to the Museum district but driving in from the Clear Lake area is just not an attractive option. I-45 is always dangerous and crowded. Part of the problem is that for some odd reason many Texans seem to enjoy sitting in traffic jams for over an hour or more and guzzling gas instead of sitting back and enjoying someone else driving while they can read or nap. The bus system is not nearly as good as you think. They get stuck in the same traffic jams as cars do. I know to take a bus from the Bay Area park and ride into downtown took my son two hours each way.

      • Tuttabella says:

        GG, I think Texans look down on bus riders as being dependent and somehow deficient, low-income and perhaps disabled, because they depend on others to do the driving. It’s about image, and also about control. Texans want to be in the driver’s seat, literally and figuratively.

      • GG says:

        That too Tutt. I know it’s odd for us to see people walking down roads and we think poor or homeless but in cities around the US and world people do walk much more. I think commuter rail and buses promote a healthier lifestyle too. Go into cities where people have to walk a few blocks and you will notice fewer obese people. This is especially true in Europe and Asia. As far as control, yes, that’s also true. I’ve heard some pretty lame excuses why former co-workers can’t use park-n-rides or car pool.

      • CaptSternn says:

        I don’t know, Tutt. The Park and Ride near where I live is usually pretty near full during the work week. I know I would use that when I had jury duty in Houston.

      • way2gosassy says:

        I agree GG I spent a most enjoyable week in DC and I loved the ability to get on a first class subway system to go all over the city. Chicago has a great rail system as well. People here are too damned afraid they might save some time and money they might have to do something with. When I retired I sold my truck and have only missed it maybe two or three times in the last 3 years.

      • Crogged says:

        I proudly used Metro Park and Ride when I worked downtown and the only downside—happy hours before catching the late bus which stopped at every lot on the way out……….

      • DanMan says:

        I have an ultra liberal sister in DC, she can match obtuse nuttiness with the best of any of you. I love hearing her stories of standing in the freezing cold and snow waiting for busses and trains when ever she troubles herself to work.

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        I remember, while my dad was stationed in D.C. in the 1970s, reading various scornful editorials in the local press about what a boondoggle the Metro system would be.

        And how wrong they were. It has its issues, as any multi-regional transportation system will, but has huge ridership and vast utility.

    • Tuttabella says:

      My mom didn’t learn to drive until late in her life, so I spent part of my youth riding the city bus around Houston, during the early 1970s, and taking Greyhound throughout Texas and to Mexico. As a result, to this day I’m totally at ease taking Metro, and I often take it to and from work, since I live and work inside the Loop and as such have easy access to bus stops and transit centers. I’m a bit resentful of Metro rail for interrupting what used to be straight bus rides through downtown, and just for show, to bring the Super Bowl to Houston. Metro’s regular riders have suffered as a result of Houston’s obsession with image and wanting to appear cosmopolitan.

      • DanMan says:

        My first bus trip locally happened when I was 13 I think. Nobody was home to give me a ride to my job as a bus boy so I figured I’d take the bus. Walked down the street, got on the bus when it stopped, paid my fare and away I went.

        I rode that dang bus all over town and saw places I had never seen. Finally the driver stops, walks back and tells me he’s driven the bus as far as he is going. He asked me where I was headed and commenced to let me know his bus would never had made that location. He gave me instructions, gave me a couple of passes and I ended up downtown, making a connection and ended up back in neighborhood way after dark.

        Yep, I blithely hopped on a bus and assumed it would take me where I wanted to go. My initial bus ride reminds me of Obama voters.

        By the time I was 16 I had two cars on my parents driveway and had older brothers and sisters that I could make dance for the privilege of borrowing one. Fun times.

      • GG says:

        Just out of curiosity, Tutt, have you ever encountered any flashers and such? My mother was on a downtown bus from her office to the Med Center and said some weird guy was sitting in the back masturbating and exposing himself to women. After one of them shrieked to high heaven, the female bus driver calmly stopped, walked back and said “I’ve told you over and over to stop that nonsense” making it clear this was a regular occurrence on that bus LOL.

      • desperado says:

        Tune in tomorrow for another exciting episode of Mind-numbingly Boring Escapades In the Life of Dan.

      • Tuttabella says:

        GG, actually, yes, at a bus stop by the Summit (now Lakewood Church), almost 20 years ago. Good thing I was wearing shades, so I was able to hide my reaction and walk casually away, as if I hadn’t noticed a “thing.”

        I’ve met many a strange character and even received a marriage proposal from a total stranger.

      • Tuttabella says:

        Dan, wasn’t the Metro slogan a while back “You can get there from here?”

        I guess the meaning of “there” is debatable.

      • GG says:

        I think the best deterrent for those guys is to point and laugh or so I’ve heard.

      • texan5142 says:

        I think pepper spray to the nut sack would work also.

      • rightonrush says:

        Speaking of pepper spray to the nut sac, here’s a good family values man that should be neutered with a rusty razor blade.
        http://www.king5.com/news/local/Police-say-abortion-clinic-bomber-is-also-accused-child-molester–244828761.html

      • bubbabobcat says:

        Actually Des, Dan just confirmed he is a patently typically ignorant and emasculated right winger afraid of his own shadow and compensates by concocting his own false reality where he is ALWAYS a “genius” and “king” in control of his own tiny little world. I’m suuuuuure little Danny’s older brothers and sisters will also vouch for how much “smarter” he is than all of them combined.

        Tres pathetique. And explains a lot why little Danny is such a richard. And troll who is so desperate that he thinks any attention is good attention.

    • bubbabobcat says:

      “As for a commuter rail line in a Southern city like Houston, it doesn’t make any sense. Houston is spread out, not confined like New York City.”

      Cappy, you really need to get out more. Guess you never heard of the Long Island Rail Road? It’s been in service for nearly 200 years now. And it stretches about 120 miles from NYC to the eastern tip of Long Island. Which by the way is more similar to Houston, Richmond, Rosenberg, Sugar Land, Conroe, The Woodlands, Kingwood, etc. than “dense” Noo Yawk City for 95% of its routes.

      Texan5142 was right. That bubble of willful ignorance is pretty impenetrable.

      • CaptSternn says:

        Dude, population density of the U.S.. look at how the North East compares to Texas.

        http://www.mapofusa.net/us-population-density-map.htm

        Get out of your bubble of ignorance. And Texas only won independence from Mexico 178 years ago. Became a state about 165 years ago. Not 200. Geez.

      • CaptSternn says:

        About 169. Derp!

      • Owl of Bellaire says:

        Population density for Texas at large, sure. But, as was pointed out in the great Republican gerrymandering scam, the majority of Texas’ population lives in the I-10 / I-35 / I-45 triangle. And, on your map, the Houston-Dallas corridor looks little different than many swathes of New York state or northern Illinois.

        Quit thinking in broad, sloppy stereotypes, Sternn, like imagining that all of Texas is like Terlingua. One would think your own map would have enabled you to look at specifics, but I guess that’s too much to ask from you.

      • bubbabobcat says:

        That was quite the meaningless non sequitur to get the last word in cappy.

        Yet you were still unable to disprove how similar Long Island is the Houston metro area and nearby communities.

        Another delusional wingnut absorbed in his own fake reality so he can always appear “right”.

        Might as well debate a brick wall.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Goodreads

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 472 other followers

%d bloggers like this: